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Applied Materials to acquire Varian Semiconductor for US$4.9 billion.

04 May 2011 | By Mark Osborne | News > Wafer Processing

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Ion implant market leader, Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, is to be acquired by Applied Materials for approximately US$4.9 billion. The deal is said to enhance Applied’s product offerings for transistor formation for front-end semiconductor processing as IC process complexity, transistor scaling and 3-D design implementation require complete and integrated product and process offerings. The deal also offers Applied new market opportunities in solar, display and light emitting diodes, where Varian has made significant investments in recent years to broaden implant technologies market opportunities. Varian reported last week that its second quarter 2011 revenue was US$330 million. Applied previously exited the ion implant market, closing the unit based in the UK in 2007.

Applied said it would fund the transaction with a combination of existing cash balances and debt.  This includes a US$2 billion, one-year senior bridge loan facility with plans in process to arrange for better longer-term debt financing structure.  Applied also has an undrawn revolving credit facility in place worth US$1 billion. A new four-year, US$1.5 billion revolving credit facility is also being used to finance the deal, which has been approved by Boards.

"Varian is a great fit for our strategy to profitably grow share in our core semiconductor business with best-in-class technology and talent," noted Mike Splinter, chairman and chief executive officer of Applied.  "The pace of product innovation is accelerating, requiring devices that are more mobile, more connected and more personalized.  These global trends are driving our customers to find new solutions for smaller transistors and faster and higher performance chips, while pushing the boundaries of innovation.  Combined, Applied and Varian will be better positioned to help our customers solve these complex challenges and deliver long-term value to shareholders."
 
"We believe the opportunity is very attractive for Varian's customers, employees and shareholders," said Varian's chief executive officer Gary Dickerson. "In addition to our combined strengths in the semiconductor space, Applied's proven capability to extend its technology to adjacent markets like solar and display can help unlock the tremendous potential of ion implantation in these markets."  
 
"Trends in chip complexity, transistor scaling and 3-D design are driving growth in the ion implantation market. Applied's broad capability in semiconductor equipment and Varian's ion implant expertise will allow us to work more closely with our customers on integrated process solutions at the transistor level," added Dr. Randhir Thakur, executive vice president and general manager of Applied's Silicon Systems Group.  "We are excited to welcome Varian's highly talented team with a history of successful innovation, execution and customer focus."

According to Applied, Varian will operate as a business unit within its Silicon Systems Group and continue to be based in Gloucester, Massachusetts. 

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